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Diet & Acne

The role of diet and acne has been controversial. Many years ago it was thought that high fatty foods caused acne, then the relationship between acne and diet was considered a myth.

One of the most common questions that a patient will ask in a consult is that if anything they are eating is causing the acne. Many studies have been done and this “theory” has evolved, there is growing evidence that supports the role of diet in inflammation and acne.

Codain et al, was one of the pioneers in demonstrating that acne is a disease of Western civilization and it is not present in populations that consume a Paleolithic diet without refined sugars, grain, milk and dairy products.

Scientist have found an association between obesity and acne. A diet high in carbohydrates, which has a high sugar level, salt, refined sugar and dairy products has been shown to produce and worsen acne.

Obese people have higher levels of testosterone than normal persons. This can increase the production of oil and can clog the pores. It is important to buy organic chicken or substitute cows milk for almond milk. Cows milk may contain steroids hormones that can increase oil production.

It is essential to decrease the consumption of simple carbohydrates like pasta, bread, potatoes, cookies; rice and processed foods, which are high in refine sugars.

Some of the foods that can be eaten that are included in a Paleolithic diet are vegetables and fruits; which are high fiber sources of carbohydrates, nuts, eggs, coconut and olive oil and beans.

It is also important to eat small portion of meals and snack through the day so you can keep your blood sugar levels stable. Eating a healthy diet will not only improve your acne but will keep you young and healthy.

Adding probiotics to your diet is also beneficial in reducing acne. It has been shown that probiotics decreases inflammation in acne. Some of the most commonly used probiotics are lactobacilli and bifidobacterium.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.